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A game mechanic that defines how much Damage a character can mitigate before they begin to loose Vitality. It can be represented by game abilities as well as physical costuming props.

Rules regarding armor can vary based on game campaign setting - players should always consult their game's rules to determine what types of props are permitted to represent what types of damage mitigation, and on what parts of their body they must wear such props. Additionally, they should review their game campaign rules to identify what abilities will provide damage mitigation without props, or what type of role play may be required to represent that ability. From the Accelerant core rules book:

Core Rules on ArmorEdit

Armor OverviewEdit

Armor provides points of protection that act as a buffer against damage effects. Armor points are removed by damage in a manner similar to Vitality. Armor points are lost before Vitality points. The method by which exhausted armor points are restored varies depending on the type of armor you are using and the skills and abilities of the Accelerant game you are playing.

Armor RulesEdit

You may only have one base type of armor active at a time. If you try to restore or activate or wear one type of armor while you have active points from another type of armor, the armor type with the lower number of active armor points will be exhausted. If there is a tie, then the new armor points will be immediately exhausted. Exhausted armor points are gone and must be restored just as if they were exhausted by Damage.

ExampleEdit

For example, Travis is wearing a 2 point suit of armor. He role plays and activates a skill that gives him 3 points of armor. The armor points from the suit of armor are exhausted and he has 3 armor points from his skill. If he wants to use the armor points from his suit of armor later, he will have to have the armor suit repaired.

Game Specific Armor RulesEdit

Each game may have specific rules that govern amounts of armor, and what costuming/props may represent armor. This is heavily influenced by the nature of the campaign setting. The difference between a modern setting, post apocalyptic setting, and high fantasy setting dictate what props the staff feel are appropriate to help maintain an appropriate atmosphere and level of immersion.

MadrigalEdit

From the Madrigal Core rules version 5.3.2:

In Madrigal, all characters may wear up to two points of physical armor. You must be skilled in the use of armor to effectively wear any more than two points. You may wear a prop worth more points without this skill, but the protection it will provide will be limited by your armor skill. A character with the Armor Smith skill can restore physical armor. The smith spends one minute of activity time role playing this repair at a forge to fix the suit of armor.

Madrigal Armor Props

In Madrigal you must have an appropriate prop to use physical armor. You have six armor areas; your head, upper torso, lower torso, shoulders, arms, and legs. A full suit covers at least four of these areas. A partial suit covers fewer areas and for each area under four you wear reduce the overall value of the armor by one.

  • Light armor includes light suede, thin leather, and furs. This type of armor provides two points.
  • Medium armor includes rigid leather, and chain mail, This type of armor provides three points.
  • Heavy armor includes scale mail, plate mail, or chain mail reinforced with rigid leather or plate pieces in at least two areas. If you wear chain mail reinforced with rigid leather or plate pieces those pieces must be clearly visible to count as heavy armor. This type of armor provides four points.

Mirror MirrorEdit

From the Mirror Mirror Core rules version 1.1:

In Mirror Mirror, the ability to wear armor comes from purchased skills. Although many people learn to use physical armor, there are also many skills that give supernatural armor. Skills that give base armor points cannot be combined. Only skills that specifically add to armor totals can be combined to increased your armor total.

There are many ways to gain armor points in Mirror Mirror. Some require an armor prop, and some do not.

Some skills will increase the total number of your armor points regardless of source. The maximum Armor you can normally achieve is 4 unless you have the Heavy Armor skill. If your Heavy Armor prop makes it obvious to a casual observer that you are wearing heavy armor and you have rigid pieces or armor such as pauldrons then it is possible to achieve 6 total armor points.

There are two exceptions to these limits. First, Grant effects can increase this limit for the duration of an event. Second, there are special Manifest skills that can give you abilities and powers when a plot character activates them. Armor points from Manifest skills can exceed the limit of 4 or 5 for heavy armor.

Mirror Mirror Armor Props

Some armor skills such as the skills from the Mastery of War require an actual armor prop. Armor props are divided into Light Armor, Medium Armor and Heavy Armor. To count for armor you prop must be visible and obvious to the casual observer. You must also have decent coverage (at least 50% coverage) on each arm, each leg, and your torso. If you lack this coverage and only have armor in 3 areas then your prop counts for one category less.

  • Light Armor is light leather or suede, quilted cloth, or natural vine weave. In a pinch a heavy cloak or long coat can count as light armor. Armor made from heavier materials also counts as light if it does not cover all five

armor areas.

  • Medium Armor is leather, fur, thick bark and light chain mail. In a pinch partial heavy armor such as a breast plate or chain mail shirt supplemented with light pieces could also be used for medium armor.
  • Heavy Armor is plate mail, scale mail, or heavy chain mail supplemented with rigid pieces. It doesn't have to be real metal, rather the armor needs to look bulky and strong to the casual observer. Not only do you need coverage in all 5 areas, but if you want to supplement your armor to reach the maximum of 5 points you will need pauldrons and similar rigid pieces that bulk you out.

End GameEdit

From the 2009 Endgame Core Rules:

Two types of armor are available on Endgame Earth.

The first are more primitive armor types, such as leather, chainmail, or plate, which are commonly handcrafted.

Players may have this sort of armor without restriction, provided they have an appropriate armor prop.

More modern armors, such as kevlar or flak jackets, have special properties and must be found in play. Players may use modern-looking armor props to to represent normal armor suits, but they have no additional properties without an item tag that grants them.

In Endgame, all characters may wear up to two points of physical armor. You must be skilled in the use of armor to effectively wear any more than two points. You may wear a prop worth more points without this skill, but the protection it will provide will be limited by your armor skill. A character with the Armor Smith skill can restore physical armor. The smith must role play for one minute at a forge to fix the suit of armor.

In Endgame, you must have an appropriate prop to use physical armor. You have six armor areas; your head, upper torso, lower torso, shoulders, arms, and legs. A full suit covers at least four of these areas. A partial suit covers fewer areas and for each area under four you wear reduce the overall value of the armor by one.

  • Light armor includes light suede, thin leather, and furs. This type of armor provides two points.
  • Medium armor includes rigid leather, and chain mail, This type of armor provides three points.
  • Heavy armor includes scale mail, plate mail, or chain mail reinforced with rigid leather or plate pieces in at least two areas. If you wear chain mail reinforced with rigid leather or plate pieces those pieces must be clearly visible to count as heavy armor. This type of armor provides four points.